[Parents] Use your Head: Recognizing Concussions in Young Athletes

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Parents Watching Youth Football Game

Concussions happen more often, and in more sports than just Football—and it affects the health and well-being of our children. Parents know their children’s behaviour better than anyone and can identify signs of concussion early when they know what to look for.  Today’s post is by guest blogger Eddie Duncan. Eddie writes frequently about youth sports, and shares with us today some key information parents need to know about youth concussions.

Over the past several years there have been an increasing amount of attention around concussions and other traumatic brain injuries in the media.  And it’s not just big head-to-head collisions in the NFL that brings the topic to the forefront.  More and more stories of concussions in young athletes across the country from grade school to high school, have come to surface.

Fortunately, the medical community has given players and coaches’ tools and information necessary to more thoroughly recognize and treat concussion symptoms.  But unfortunately, many programs overlook symptoms to push athletes to perform, or players ignore signs, brushing them off in fear of losing play time or being cut.

Because of this, responsibility ultimately falls on parents to know how to recognize early signs of concussions, beyond the “big hit”.  They are the ones closet to their child and know how they act and behave on a regular basis. Catching symptoms before the young athlete gets back on the field or court can save them from further injury, long-term neurological disorders, paralysis, or worse.

Signs for Parents to Watch
Watching a child take a big hit in a game is nothing easy to swallow for parents, and there’s always a sigh of relief when the child gets up unscathed. But concussions go unseen.  Signs and symptoms can show up immediately or may take hours to be noticed.  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says to look out for these signs after a big hit:

  • Difficulty thinking clearly, concentrating, or remembering
  • Feeling slowed down or hazy
  • Headaches or a feeling of pressure
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Balance issues
  • Blurry vision or sensitivity to light
  • Numbness or tingling
  • Irritability, sadness, nervous, or generally more emotional
  • Sleep issues:  too much or too little

More Awareness Benefits Everyone
There is good news.  Over 42 states have passed laws to reduce concussions in youth sports. Many parents have to sign concussion information forms before their child can participate each season.  And many coaches have to attend concussion training sessions and are required to pull athletes from the game if showing any symptoms of brain trauma.  In addition to education on what signs to report, athletes also need to know that it’s okay to miss out on some play today if it means they can play more down the road.

As more awareness develops, more youth will be able to more fully enjoy their favorite sports, more coaches will retain competitive players, and more parents will enjoy seeing their athletes shine.  Remind your players to keep their head in the game, just not literally.

Eddie Duncan is a Senior Editor at Direct2tv and loves to write and research about youth sports.

For more information on how to keep your kids safe visit The Network for Public Health Law and STOP Sports Injuries.

Image Credit: By Chiew Pang, Flickr

4 thoughts on “[Parents] Use your Head: Recognizing Concussions in Young Athletes

  1. Above all else if you suspect your child has suffered a concussion DO NOT let them back onto the field until they are cleared by a doctor. Even a light ding can have serious repercussions, especially if they get dinged again.

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